Investigating the security of Lime scooters


(Note: to be clear, this vulnerability does not exist in the current version of the software on these scooters. Also, this is not the topic of my Kawaiicon talk.)I've been looking at the security of the Lime escooters. These caught my attention because:(1) There's a whole bunch of them outside my building, and(2) I can see them via Bluetooth from my sofa

which, given that I'm extremely lazy, made them more attractive targets than something that would actually require me to leave my home. I did some digging. Limes run Linux and have a single running app that's responsible for scooter management. They have an internal debug port that exposes USB and which, until this happened, ran adb (as root!) over this USB. As a result, there's a fair amount of information available in various places, which made it easier to start figuring out how they work.

The obvious attack surface is Bluetooth (Limes have wifi, but only appear to use it to upload lists of nearby wifi networks, presumably for geolocation if they can't get a GPS fix). Each Lime broadcasts its name as Lime-12345678 where 12345678 is 8 digits of hex. They implement Bluetooth Low Energy and expose a custom service with various attributes. One of these attributes (0x35 on at least some of them) sends Bluetooth traffic to the application processor, which then parses it. This is where things get a little more interesting. The app has a core event loop that can take commands from multiple sources and then makes a decision about which component to dispatch them to. Each command is of the following form:

AT+type,password,time,sequence,data$where type is one of either ATH, QRY, CMD or DBG. The password is a TOTP derived from the IMEI of the scooter, the time is simply the current date and time of day, the sequence is a monotonically increasing counter and the data is a blob of JSON. The command is terminated with a $ sign. The code is fairly agnostic about where the command came from, which means that you can send the same commands over Bluetooth as you can over the cellular network that the Limes are connected to. Since locking and unlocking is triggered by one of these commands being sent over the network, it ought to be possible to do the same by pushing a command over Bluetooth.Unfortunately for nefarious individuals, all commands sent over Bluetooth are ignored until an authentication step is performed. The code I looked at had two ways of performing authentication - you could send an authentication token that was derived from the scooter's IMEI and the current time and some other stuff, or you could send a token that was just an HMAC of the IMEI and a static secret. Doing the latter was more appealing, both because it's simpler and because doing so flipped the scooter into manufacturing mode at which point all other command validation was also disabled (bye bye having to generate a TOTP). But how do we get the IMEI? There's actually two approaches:1) Read it off the sticker that's on the side of the scooter (obvious, uninteresting)2) Take advantage of how the scooter's Bluetooth name is generated

Remember the 8 digits of hex I mentioned earlier? They're generated by taking the IMEI, encrypting it using DES and a static key (0x11, 0x22, 0x33, 0x44, 0x55, 0x66, 0x77, 0x88), discarding the first 4 bytes of the output and turning the last 4 bytes into 8 digits of hex. Since we're discarding information, there's no way to immediately reverse the process - but IMEIs for a given manufacturer are all allocated from the same range, so we can just take the entire possible IMEI space for the modem chipset Lime use, encrypt all of them and end up with a mapping of name to IMEI (it turns out this doesn't guarantee that the mapping is unique - for around 0.01%, the same name maps to two different IMEIs). So we now have enough information to generate an authentication token that we can send over Bluetooth, which disables all further authentication and enables us to send further commands to disconnect the scooter from the network (so we can't be tracked) and then unlock and enable the scooter.

(Note: these are actual crimes)

This all seemed very exciting, but then a shock twist occurred - earlier this year, Lime updated their authentication method and now there's actual asymmetric cryptography involved and you'd need to engage in rather more actual crimes to obtain the key material necessary to authenticate over Bluetooth, and all of this research becomes much less interesting other than as an example of how other companies probably shouldn't do it.

In any case, congratulations to Lime on actually implementing security!